A sushi experience in Japan

Sushi monster is happy

Sushi monster is happy

On our second evening in Japan, it was more than enough to be eating in not-worth-to tell restaurants and our son -as a sushi monster- was getting angry with the food. So we were lucky to come across a sushi bar/restaurant, before checking in to our hotel in Hiroshima.

Not so easy. In many (almost all) restaurants in Japan, there is always a waiting time to be seated. The good thing is you spend this time, comfortably sitting on the chairs provided by the restaurant. The bad thing is this waiting time can be frustratedly long, sometimes. But before to be able to be seated to these nice chairs, there is always a little exam to pass. By the end of our trip, we were experienced in answering these questions, but in the first experience of sushi restaurant;

First exam

First exam

So, we went in (as normal), asked to be seated for three (as normal) and the waiter asked us something that we did not understand one single word. So we asked “Do you speak English?” (as normal), and she said “Yes” (as normal), but we understood that the only English she speaks is the word “yes”. She showed us the exam questionnaire similar to the one above and expected to understand it. With the struggle of about 10 minutes with still waiting to be seated, an English speaking gentleman among the customers helped us at last. In short, actually the questions were very simple: Name, how many people and where do you want to be seated (Can be inside/outside or smoking/non smoking, or bar/table or a combination)

Waiting our place to be ready

Waiting our place to be ready

And so we were accepted to sit inside at comfortable chairs, in order to wait for our table and after about a 10 minutes waiting time, there we were, sitting on bar stools and started to choose and eat from the sushi plates on trails passing in front of us.

Just grab and eat

Just grab and eat

However, when we tried to grab a fake sushi from the bar to eat, all staff made fun of us, as some of the plates did have a fake sushi on them and they were made to order, which we did not know as you may guess. We understood that, higher priced sushi, were not done in advance and either a picture or a plastic (believe me looks like real) of it was moving on the trail, for customers to order.

The pricing is another exam of these restaurants, which we did not consider much because, all were very cheap compared to the sushi we eat in our hometown. But if you need to calculate what you eat in advance, there is usually such a wall:

Menu on wall

Menu on wall

On this wall you try to understand the colors of the plates that are 130 yen. The plates other than these are more expensive.

Some interesting plates on the trail

Some interesting plates on the trail

Next: Hiroshima and around

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